Hemolysis

August 14 20:56 2019 Print This Article

Hemolysis is the destruction of red blood cells which leads to the release of hemoglobin from within the red blood cells into the blood plasma . Although new red blood cells, or erythrocytes, are continuously created and old ones destroyed, an excessive rate of destruction sometimes occurs. The dead cells, in sufficiently large numbers, overwhelm the organ that destroys them, the spleen , so that serum pigments resulting from hemoglobin breakdown appear in the blood serum.

Jaundice is caused by overloading the liver with pigment. Large-scale destruction of red blood cells, from any of a variety of causes, results in anemia. Rh disease, or erythroblastosis fetalis , is a hemolytic disease of newborns caused by an immune reaction between fetal red blood cells and maternal antibodies to them.

Some hemolytic conditions, e.g., those in which red blood cells are fragile and rupture easily, are treated by removal of the spleen to slow cell breakdown or by administration of steroid . Autoimmune hemolytic conditions result from splenomegaly . The spleen not only sequesters red blood cells, but produces antibodies against the body’s red blood cells. This is a potentially lethal condition that occurs more often in women than men.

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